Category Archives: Don Greenwood

Getting Your Arms Around the Risk and Cost of Business Travel

Rick, a Houston based HR manager, arranges travel to the company’s Guatemala City office to roll-out next year’s benefits package.  He arrives at the Guatemala office only to learn the people he needs to meet with have all departed to Houston for meetings with operation leadership.  Wouldn’t it be great to have an easy to use software that requires Rick’s trip be approved ahead of time by his boss, the host country manager, and perhaps his cost center manager?  How about notifying Corporate Security of his travel plans? Business Travel Assurance (BTA) is a fully deployed, stable software system developed by Don Greenwood & Associates Inc. that accomplishes all of this and more.

On a more serious note, when on 9/1/2012 the U.S. embassy was attacked in Benghazi, our client had operations in Libya.  In minutes, they knew which employees were there, which were in route, and who had planned travel to go there in the near term.  All easy to pull reports from BTA.

BTA operates on the company email system – no need to sign-on to a separate software application. When a travel itinerary is booked, BTA checks the destinations against a configurable list and takes these actions:

  • An automatically generated email alert is sent to the traveler stating this travel booking needs approval.
  • If the country is in the high-risk category, Corporate Security is notified and must clear the travel before it can proceed.
  • A similar email is sent to the traveler’s manager, asking for the approval.  The manager can take one of three options – approve the trip, disapprove, or ask for more information.
  • An email is also sent to the cost center manager seeking financial approval.  And an email notifies the destination country manager as well.
  • If the destination is on a health alert list, an email is sent to the medical department, so they can provide necessary inoculations and information.
  • The system also asks the traveler if they are going to a conference.  If the answer is yes, it asks if they are a presenter and several other questions.  Therefore, travel costs for conferences is significantly reduced.
  • Manager can pull many reports from the system: travelers by approving manager, trips by a single traveler, volume of travel to a specific destination, etc.

BTA is a fully deployed, cloud-based solution designed to help assure business traveler safety, managerial awareness, and cost control. Originally designed to facilitate a client-specific international travel approval process, BTA has evolved as a comprehensive platform for managing business travel at the enterprise level.

Click here to learn more about BTA.

Contact Don Greenwood & Associates, Inc. for further information.

don@greenwoodsecurity.com or info@greenwoodsecurity.com

The Persistent Threat of Terrorism

Since 2013 there has been 159 homegrown jihadist cases in 30 states. Recent examples of homegrown terror-related incidents cited in the report include the case of a 28-year-old Ohio resident, Laith Alebbini, who was arrested Sept. 5 and charged with attempting to provide material support to ISIS. Also on Sept. 5, 26-year-old Alexander Ciccolo of Adams, Mass., was sentenced to 20 years in prison for the same crime. According to the snapshot, Ciccolo “planned to use pressure cooker explosives and firearms to target places where large numbers of people congregated, such as college cafeterias.” Ciccolo is the son of a Boston police captain.

To read more, click here.

Is Your Building/Office Space Secure?

A recent FBI report reveals that a majority of active shooters spend at least a week planning their attack and often attack people and places with which they were already familiar. In the majority of active shooter cases, the active shooter knew and actively targeted at least one of the victims.

In this growing threat environment, employees are expressing concerns about acts of workplace violence and active shooter. The most important security measures for workplace protection are employee awareness training and a fundamental building security program.

A thorough and detailed building security risk assessment (SRA) and report are the first steps in developing an effective building security program to protect people and critical assets. The SRA provides for the foundation of a risk management program.

 The objective of conducting a security assessment is to assess security risks as a means to assist management in identifying and understanding the risks that face the organization.  This assists management in making informed decisions on the adequacy of security and the need for additional security countermeasures to address threats, risks, vulnerabilities and potential consequences.

Contact Don Greenwood & Associates, Inc. to have us conduct a security assessment on your building or office spaces.

Complete Active Shooter and Workplace Violence Program

“I knew this was going to happen.” That is the statement given in more than 50% of workplace and school rage killings.

We have learned that employees are unlikely to report emerging situations to management unless they feel confident that management has a plan and an organized response to address the issue.

Don Greenwood & Associates has supported clients with workplace violence prevention and response programs since 1995 – companies in oil & gas, field services, manufacturing, business, chemicals and computing.

Our program is comprehensive, ready for rapid deployment throughout the workforce, and includes:

  • A template for establishing a Threat Management Team (consistent with ASIS and SHRM guidelines) that includes specific responsibilities for Security, HSE, HR, Legal, and Operations.
  • A Quick Action Guide addressing active shooter situations – ready for distribution to your employees immediately.
  • A PowerPoint training program for employees that encourages reporting, engagement, and concise standards of behavior.
  • A PowerPoint for managers and supervisors with guidelines and standards for intervening in and managing workplace disruption.
  • Training materials to help employees formulate their own plans for run, hide, and fight – based on their immediate workplace environment.
  • Guidelines on assessing the potential for violence in emerging situations and strategies for managing these threats.

The program is complete, cost effective, and ready to tailor to your company’s needs and culture.

Send me an email or give me a call for more information – Don Greenwood, don@greenwoodsecurity.com, 281-435-2339.

Check out our website – www.greenwoodsecurity.com

Don Greenwood & Associates, Inc. – Full Service Security Management Consultants since 2003

3 Tips for a Successful USCG Inspection

Many companies aren’t prepared when they receive a letter from the U.S. Coast Guard notifying them of an upcoming facility security inspection. You might have documents that are out of date, or you may be missing the necessary forms. If left unchecked, you could be forced to waste time and money in enforcing corrective actions. When it comes to advising our clients to be prepared, these are the top three tips we give them for a successful USCG Inspection.

Review Your Documents

When you receive a notice from the USCG about an upcoming inspection, this is always a good time to review your FSP and required documents to make sure that you have everything in order. Also, this is a good time to verify that you have conducted the required quarterly drills, annual exercise, and annual audit of the FSP.

Training Moment

Training is very important for facility personnel and this is a good opportunity to make sure all your training is up to date and to have a general discussion regarding security of the facility. The training can focus on topics that will most likely be covered during the inspection; including TWIC, screening, security personnel (who is the FSO, Alt. FSO?), MARSEC security measures, etc.

Organize

One thing that we recommend and develop for majority of our clients is to have a single security plan binder with all relevant documents and forms. This is a perfect, centralized place to store and secure all the forms and documents that the USCG will want to review during the inspection. We have had great success with these binders for all of our regulated clients; MTSA, CFATS, TSA, DOT, etc. As we tell our clients, it is best to get the inspectors the requested material in a timely fashion and get the inspection over with as quickly as possible.

Recently one of our clients had a US Coast Guard inspection that they passed without any issues, “We went through our MARSEC book while the USCG was here and we were complimented on how all the files for MARSEC were in one book and not in different locations.  We didn’t spend much time with it, because everything was in the binder that they had questions about. “

Let us know if we can help you prepare for USCG Security Inspection and develop a security binder for you and help you succeed with your inspections.

The Security Guard Audit

A few weeks ago, USCG officers arrived at a regulated facility, and observed the main gate security officer not inspecting and validating TWIC cards, and not conducting vehicle inspections as required in the Facility Security Plan. For a moment, the USCG considered shutting down the facility. Recently the USCG also released a list on common MTSA Facility Violations.

We are often retained to conduct brief audits and training moments with entry guards. It works like this: one of us arrives at the entry point and observes security checking in and admitting people to the facility. Then we check in ourselves and spend a few moments with security management to relay our findings. Within moments, we return to the security post, explain that we just conducted an audit and spend a few moments renewing their training. These moments are powerful training tools that will not soon be forgotten. Ken Blanchard, the author of The One Minute Manager, said that supervisors should make every encounter with their staff a learning moment:

  • Catch them doing something wrong, quickly reprimand and then take a moment to retrain.
  • Catch them doing something right, quickly praise and let them know what they did so well.
  • Or, just stop by for a one minute reminder on a procedure or conduct that is important.

Penetration audits can give some indication of how well personnel are performing, but the real value comes from the training that results.

Article on Developing a Workplace Violence Plan

Don Greenwood was interviewed for an article for HRTools.com on Developing a Workplace Violence Plan:

Top 3 Things Your Workplace Violence Plan Should Contain
By: Jennifer Leahy | Wednesday, December 01, 2010

Perhaps everyone who works in your office gets along perfectly and there is never a cross word. Maybe all of your customers and suppliers are equally as delightful and would never harm anyone under any circumstance. Most companies aren