Category Archives: Don Greenwood

3 Tips for a Successful USCG Inspection

Many companies aren’t prepared when they receive a letter from the U.S. Coast Guard notifying them of an upcoming facility security inspection. You might have documents that are out of date, or you may be missing the necessary forms. If left unchecked, you could be forced to waste time and money in enforcing corrective actions. When it comes to advising our clients to be prepared, these are the top three tips we give them for a successful USCG Inspection.

Review Your Documents

When you receive a notice from the USCG about an upcoming inspection, this is always a good time to review your FSP and required documents to make sure that you have everything in order. Also, this is a good time to verify that you have conducted the required quarterly drills, annual exercise, and annual audit of the FSP.

Training Moment

Training is very important for facility personnel and this is a good opportunity to make sure all your training is up to date and to have a general discussion regarding security of the facility. The training can focus on topics that will most likely be covered during the inspection; including TWIC, screening, security personnel (who is the FSO, Alt. FSO?), MARSEC security measures, etc.

Organize

One thing that we recommend and develop for majority of our clients is to have a single security plan binder with all relevant documents and forms. This is a perfect, centralized place to store and secure all the forms and documents that the USCG will want to review during the inspection. We have had great success with these binders for all of our regulated clients; MTSA, CFATS, TSA, DOT, etc. As we tell our clients, it is best to get the inspectors the requested material in a timely fashion and get the inspection over with as quickly as possible.

Recently one of our clients had a US Coast Guard inspection that they passed without any issues, “We went through our MARSEC book while the USCG was here and we were complimented on how all the files for MARSEC were in one book and not in different locations.  We didn’t spend much time with it, because everything was in the binder that they had questions about. “

Let us know if we can help you prepare for USCG Security Inspection and develop a security binder for you and help you succeed with your inspections.

The Security Guard Audit

A few weeks ago, USCG officers arrived at a regulated facility, and observed the main gate security officer not inspecting and validating TWIC cards, and not conducting vehicle inspections as required in the Facility Security Plan. For a moment, the USCG considered shutting down the facility. Recently the USCG also released a list on common MTSA Facility Violations.

We are often retained to conduct brief audits and training moments with entry guards. It works like this: one of us arrives at the entry point and observes security checking in and admitting people to the facility. Then we check in ourselves and spend a few moments with security management to relay our findings. Within moments, we return to the security post, explain that we just conducted an audit and spend a few moments renewing their training. These moments are powerful training tools that will not soon be forgotten. Ken Blanchard, the author of The One Minute Manager, said that supervisors should make every encounter with their staff a learning moment:

  • Catch them doing something wrong, quickly reprimand and then take a moment to retrain.
  • Catch them doing something right, quickly praise and let them know what they did so well.
  • Or, just stop by for a one minute reminder on a procedure or conduct that is important.

Penetration audits can give some indication of how well personnel are performing, but the real value comes from the training that results.

Article on Developing a Workplace Violence Plan

Don Greenwood was interviewed for an article for HRTools.com on Developing a Workplace Violence Plan:

Top 3 Things Your Workplace Violence Plan Should Contain
By: Jennifer Leahy | Wednesday, December 01, 2010

Perhaps everyone who works in your office gets along perfectly and there is never a cross word. Maybe all of your customers and suppliers are equally as delightful and would never harm anyone under any circumstance. Most companies aren