Category Archives: Building Security

The Reception/Front Desk Reference Guide and The Field Security Resource Manual

Two content rich templates ready to customize for your facilities.

The Reception/Front Desk Reference Guide

  • Developed from our large procedure library with recent input from Security Directors.
  •  Includes Reception Duties, Confidentiality, Use of Email and Phone Systems, and Emergency Response guidance ranging from dealing with activists and protestors, angry and distressed persons in the lobby, process servers, weather emergencies, and dozens of other response procedures.
  • We are ready to align our template with your department’s specific requirements and insert your contact lists in the finished document.
  • In use now by several large companies in oil, gas, and chemicals.

The Field Security Resource Manual

  • Most of our oil, gas, pipeline, and chemical clients have field facilities where security is managed or supervised by EH&S, port FSOs, or operations personnel.  Clients asked us for a field security guide that would speed up training for the field and provide a catalogue of general security management information for their everyday reference.
  • Our template includes a wide range of topics from Guard Force Contracting and Management, to practical steps in Risk Assessment, perimeter protection and responding to threats.

*Contact us to arrange a visit to view the Field Security Manual; or ask for an online meeting.

Your Facility Needs a Security Plan

All facilities need a security plan, whether required by regulation or not.

Security plans should be designed to control access to the facility, prevent intrusions, and reduce the chances of theft or other loses , and to provide procedures for response to security incidents.

Security planning must take into consideration that the adversary sets the agenda.  This is an important and too little discussed reality. Building occupants, even building security, are unlikely to know that an adversary is considering an adverse attack or criminal intrusion. (click here to read more about how The Adversary Sets the Agenda)

Security plans protect people and their safety.

Security plans should:

  • be facility specific and include security requirements and procedures for both normal and emergency or crisis operations
  • describe the roles and responsibilities for security related tasks
  • describe in detail how access is managed for the facility
  • describe the physical security features and security countermeasures of the facility and their importance in protecting people and the facility
  • describe how the facility will test, maintain, and repair the physical security features
  • identify all critical areas of the facility and address the level of protection required for each area
  • have procedures and policies for how to respond to a security incident
  • have a system in place for reporting and investigating a security incident
  • provide for ongoing employee security awareness training
  • have policies and procedures for protecting critical cyber and IT infrastructure and systems
  • describe how the facility will test and exercise the security plan
  • be reviewed frequently and updated as needed

A Security Risk Assessment should be conducted prior to developing a security plan.

Contact Don Greenwood & Associates, Inc. to have us conduct a security assessment on your facility and assist you in developing your security plan.

The Persistent Threat of Terrorism

Since 2013 there has been 159 homegrown jihadist cases in 30 states. Recent examples of homegrown terror-related incidents cited in the report include the case of a 28-year-old Ohio resident, Laith Alebbini, who was arrested Sept. 5 and charged with attempting to provide material support to ISIS. Also on Sept. 5, 26-year-old Alexander Ciccolo of Adams, Mass., was sentenced to 20 years in prison for the same crime. According to the snapshot, Ciccolo “planned to use pressure cooker explosives and firearms to target places where large numbers of people congregated, such as college cafeterias.” Ciccolo is the son of a Boston police captain.

To read more, click here.

The Adversary Sets the Agenda

Security planning must take into consideration that the Adversary sets the agenda and is better informed when plotting than the security strategist.

The threat adversary sets the agenda.  This is an important and too little discussed reality.

Building occupants, even building security, do not know that an adversary is considering an adverse attack or criminal intrusion.  The building and suite occupants “blindly” implement security measures that are customary and often “cosmetic”.  However, the adversary has an agenda:

  • They have an objective ranging from simple theft of purses and wallets to incidents of workplace violent, including rage killings.
  • They know the “territory” – they have studied and surveilled the building and avenues of access.  They know how ineffective the lobby guard is.  They have a target and a plan.
  • They want to enter incognito – their observations of building activity show they what to do to maintain a low profile.
  • In active shooter situations, they may be suicidal and have no plan of escape, which makes them very dangerous.
  • They will likely identify the same vulnerabilities that have been identified during a security assessment.

Security countermeasures must mitigate these risk as far as is reasonable and possible.  They should be deterred by at least two access-controlled perimeters to complicate their plan and increase their risk of detection.

Watch for our series of blogs on the security assessment process.

Is Your Building/Office Space Secure?

A recent FBI report reveals that a majority of active shooters spend at least a week planning their attack and often attack people and places with which they were already familiar. In the majority of active shooter cases, the active shooter knew and actively targeted at least one of the victims.

In this growing threat environment, employees are expressing concerns about acts of workplace violence and active shooter. The most important security measures for workplace protection are employee awareness training and a fundamental building security program.

A thorough and detailed building security risk assessment (SRA) and report are the first steps in developing an effective building security program to protect people and critical assets. The SRA provides for the foundation of a risk management program.

 The objective of conducting a security assessment is to assess security risks as a means to assist management in identifying and understanding the risks that face the organization.  This assists management in making informed decisions on the adequacy of security and the need for additional security countermeasures to address threats, risks, vulnerabilities and potential consequences.

Contact Don Greenwood & Associates, Inc. to have us conduct a security assessment on your building or office spaces.